Historical
Ogden v Saunders: The Contracts Clause

Ogden v Saunders

In Ogden v Saunders, 25 U.S. 213 (1827), the U.S. Supreme Court held that a New York bankruptcy law did not violate the Constitution’s Contracts Clause. The case is also most remembered as the only decision from which Chief Justice John Marshall dissented. The Obligation of Contracts Clause Article I, Section 10 provides that “No State shall . [...]

Historical
Wayman v Southard: The Limits of Non-delegation

Wayman v Southard

In Wayman v Southard, 23 U.S. 10 Wheat. 1 1 (1825), the U.S. Supreme Court first grappled with the doctrine of non-delegation, under which one branch of government can’t delegate its constitutionally authorized power to another. In the decision, Chief Justice John Marshall distinguished between "important" subjects and mere details, which the Court held Congress [...]

In Betterman v. Montana, 578 U. S. ____ (2016), the U.S. Supreme Court clarified that the Sixth Amendment’s speedy trial guarantee does not apply once a defendant has been found guilty at trial or has pleaded guilty to criminal charges. The Court’s decision was unanimous.

In Betterman v. Montana, 578 U. S. ____ (2016), the U.S. Supreme Court clarified that the Sixth Amendment’s speedy trial guarantee does not apply once a defendant has been found guilty at trial or has pleaded guilty to criminal charges. The Court’s decision was unanimous. The Speedy Trial Clause  The Speedy Trial Clause of the [...]

Martin v Mott

In Martin v. Mott, 25 U.S. 19 (1827), the U.S. Supreme Court addressed the Constitution’s Militia Clause. It held that the President, as commander in chief, has the unilateral power to call up state militias for duty during times of war.  The Facts of the Case  Pursuant to Article 1, Section 8, Clause 15 of [...]

Spokeo v Robins

While Spokeo, Inc. v Robins, 578 U. S. ____ (2016), was one of the most anticipated decisions of the October 2016 Term, the U.S. Supreme Court ultimately remanded the case back to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to further address the issue of standing. By a vote of 6-2, the Court held that the [...]

Osborn v Bank of the United States

In Osborn v Bank of the United States, 22 US. (9 Wheat.) 738 (1824), the U.S. Supreme Court addressed Article III’s grant of judicial power over cases “arising under” federal law. In his opinion, Chief Justice John Marshall broadly interpreted the power of Congress to confer jurisdiction to the federal courts. The Facts of Osborn v [...]

Sturges v Crowninshield

In Sturges v Crowninshield, 17 U.S. (4 Wheat.) 122 (1819), the U.S. Supreme Court considered whether a New York bankruptcy law, and its retroactive application, were constitutional. The justices concluded that federal power over bankruptcy was not exclusive. However, they struck down the retroactive aspect of the law as violating the Constitution’s Contracts Clause. The [...]

Taylor v United States

In Taylor v United States (2016), the U.S. Supreme Court held that “commerce” under the Hobbs Act should be interpreted broadly. Accordingly, it found that the government had satisfied its burden by establishing that the defendant robbed a drug dealer of drugs or drug proceeds.  The Facts in Taylor v United States Anthony Taylor was indicted under [...]

United States v Hudson and Goodwin

In United States v Hudson and Goodwin, 11 U.S. 32 (1812), the U.S. Supreme Court first considered whether the federal courts were authorized to hear criminal cases. The justices held that Congress must confer jurisdiction by statute in order for the court to render a conviction. The Facts in United States v Hudson and Goodwin Defendants [...]

Fisher v University of Texas at Austin

In Fisher v University of Texas at Austin (2016), the U.S. Supreme Court held that the race-conscious admissions program in use by the university when Abigail Fisher applied to the school in 2008 is lawful under the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause. The justices split 4-3 on the controversial affirmative action case. The Facts of the [...]