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In Montgomery v. Louisiana, 577 U. S. ____ (2016), the U.S. Supreme Court addressed how state courts should apply its decision in Miller v. Alabama, in which the Court held that the Eighth Amendment prohibits a sentencing scheme that requires life in prison without the possibility of parole for juvenile homicide offenders.

In Montgomery v. Louisiana, 577 U. S. ____ (2016), the U.S. Supreme Court addressed how state courts should apply its decision in Miller v. Alabama, in which the Court held that the Eighth Amendment prohibits a sentencing scheme that requires life in prison without the possibility of parole for juvenile homicide offenders. Montgomery v. Louisiana [...]

In Pollock v. Farmers Loan & Trust Co., 157 U.S. 429 (1895), the U.S. Supreme Court held that federal taxes on interest, dividends and rents violated Article 1 of the U.S. Constitution.

In Pollock v. Farmers Loan & Trust Co., 157 U.S. 429 (1895), the U.S. Supreme Court held that federal taxes on interest, dividends and rents violated Article 1 of the U.S. Constitution. In 1913, the adoption of the Sixteenth Amendment nullified the decision by removing the requirement that income tax be apportioned. The Facts of [...]

Campbell-Ewald Co. v. Gomez: Class Actions and Article III

Campbell-Ewald Co. v. Gomez: Class Actions and Article III

In Campbell-Ewald Co. v. Gomez, 577 U. S. ____ (2016), the U.S. Supreme Court considered whether a case becomes moot, and thus beyond the judicial power of Article III, when the plaintiff receives and rejects an offer of complete relief on his claim. By a vote of 6-3, the justices ruled that an unaccepted settlement [...]

In United States v. E.C. Knight, 156 U.S. 1 (1895), the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Sherman Anti-Trust Act was a valid exercise of Congress’ power under the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution.

In United States v. E.C. Knight, 156 U.S. 1 (1895), the U.S. Supreme Court held that the Sherman Anti-Trust Act was a valid exercise of Congress’ power under the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution. However, it also held that the statute could not be used to prevent a monopoly in the manufacture of goods. [...]

Hurst v. Florida: Only a Jury Can Impose the Death Sentence

Hurst v. Florida: Only a Jury Can Impose the Death Sentence

On January 12, 2016, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down Florida’s capital-sentencing scheme in Hurst v. Florida, 577 U. S. (2016). By a vote of 8-1, the justices held that allowing the trial judge to have the final say on a death sentence violated the Sixth Amendment, right to trial by jury, of the U.S. [...]

In Kingsley v. Hendrickson, 576 US _ (2015), the U.S. Supreme Court addressed the legal standard for finding unconstitutionally excessive force during pre-trial detention. By a vote of 5-4, the justices held that a pretrial detainee pursuing an excessive force claim need only demonstrate that the force used against him was objectively unreasonable.

In Kingsley v. Hendrickson, 576 US _ (2015), the U.S. Supreme Court addressed the legal standard for finding unconstitutionally excessive force during pre-trial detention. By a vote of 5-4, the justices held that a pretrial detainee pursuing an excessive force claim need only demonstrate that the force used against him was objectively unreasonable. The Facts of Kingsley v. [...]

Abood v. Detroit Board of Education

In Abood v. Detroit Board of Education, 431 U.S. 209 (1977), the U.S. Supreme Court held that the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution does not prohibit governments from requiring non-union public employees to pay their “fair share” of dues for collective bargaining, contract administration, and grievance adjustment. The continued viability of the case will [...]

Johnson v. the United States: ACCA Unconstitutionally Vague

In Johnson v. the United States, 576 US _ (2015), the U.S. Supreme Court held that the residual clause of the Armed Career Criminal Act was unconstitutionally vague and violated the due process rights of the petitioner. The statute imposes increased sentences on defendants charged with illegal possession of firearms who have previously been convicted of three or more "violent" felonies.

In Johnson v. the United States, 576 US _ (2015), the U.S. Supreme Court held that the residual clause of the Armed Career Criminal Act was unconstitutionally vague and violated the due process rights of the petitioner. The statute imposes increased sentences on defendants charged with illegal possession of firearms who have previously been convicted [...]

Alabama Dept. of Revenue v. CSX Transportation

In Alabama Dept. of Revenue v. CSX Transportation, 135 S.Ct. 1136 (2015), the U.S. Supreme Court addressed what constitutes tax discrimination under the Railroad Revitalization and Regulation Reform Act of 1976, otherwise known as the “4-R Act.” In its decision, the Court held that lower courts should consider the tax scheme as a whole rather [...]

Jennings v. Stephens: Certificate of Appealability Not Required for Habeas Petitioner

In Jennings v. Stephens, 135 S.Ct. 793 (2015), the U.S. Supreme Court addressed how to apply the Court’s decision in United States v. American Railway Express Co., 265 U. S. 42 (1924) to habeas relief. In that case, the Court held that an appellee who does not take a cross-appeal may “urge in support of [...]